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Chapter 11
Appendix
11.34. Invasive Species Coordination and Control DOT Resources

State DOT Listings of Their Top Priority Invasive Species

SPECIES

STATE DOTS FOR WHICH THE SPECIES IS A TOP PRIORITY

Asiatic/Oriental bittersweet

CT, NH, NC, RI

Australian pine

FL

Autumn olive

CT, IN

Bamboo

SC

Branched broomrape

TX

Brazilian pepper

FL

Broomsedge

NC

Bush honeysuckle

KY, NH

Callery pear

AR

Camelthorn

AZ

Canada thistle

CO, IL, IN, IA, MD, MN, NE, OH, SD, WV, WI, WY

Cape ivy

CA

Chinese bush clover

KS

Chinese Clematis

CO

Cogongrass

FL, LA, MS

Common buckthorn

MN

Common or cutleaf teasels

IL, IA, MO

Dalmation toadflax

AZ, WA

Diffuse knapweed

CO, WY

Empress tree

VA

Field Bindweed

KS, NE, WI

French broom

CA

Giant hogweed

NY

Giant reed

CA, TX

Gorse

OR

Guinea Grass

HI

Hairy whitetop / Hoary cress

NM, NV

Hydrilla

FL

Italian ryegrass

MS

Itchgrass

LA

Ivy gourd

HI

Japanese Knotweed

CT, KY, NH, NY, NC, OR, RI

Johnsongrass

AR, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, MS, MO, OH, SC, TX, VA

Jointed goatgrass

NM

Knapweeds

NM, WA

Knotweeds

WA, WV

Burning bush (Kochia)

WA

Kudzu

AR, FL, IL, MS, MO, NC, SC, TX, VA, WV

Leafy spurge

CO, IA, MN, NE, SD, WI

Old World climbing fern (Lygodium)

FL

Maile pilau

HI

Mile-a-minute

MD

Multiflora rose

KS, NH, WV

Musk thistle

IA, KS, KY, MO, OH, WY

Mysore thorn

HI

Peruvian watergrass

LA

Phragmites / Common reed

CT, IN, MD, NY

Poison hemlock

KY, OH

Purple loosestrife

CT, IL, IN, MN, NY, OH, RI

Reed canarygrass

OR

Russian knapweed

AZ, NV, WY

Russian olive

RI

Russian thistle

OR

Ryegrass

SC

Salt cedar

CO, NE, NM, TX

Shoebutton

HI

Spotted knapweed

MN, MO, NE, NV, OR, WY

Tall whitetop

NV

Tallow trees

LA

Thistles spp.

AZ, AR, CA, NV, NM, SC

Tree of heaven Ailanthus altissima

MD, RI, VA, WV

Tropical soda apple

FL

Trumpet vine

VA

Water hyacinth

FL

Wild parsnip

IA

Yellow starthistle

WA


NON-WEED INVASIVES

STATE DOTS FOR WHICH THE SPECIES IS A TOP PRIORITY

Africanized bees

AZ

Bagworm

MD

Boll weevil

NC

Dutch elm disease

MN

Eastern tent caterpillar

MD

Emerald ash borer

OH

Grasshoppers

MN

Gypsy moth

MD, NH, NC

Eucalyptus redgum lerp psyllid

CA

Mimosa webworm

MD

Oak wilt

MN, TX

Pine bark beetle

MN

Red imported fire ants

AZ, LA, NC, SC, TX

Sudden oak death

CA

West Nile virus

AZ, NM, RI, VA, WA

Zebra mussel

AR, NY



Lists of Top Priority Species by Scientific and Common Names, with Sources for Further Information

COMMON NAMES

SCIENTIFIC NAME

Asiatic/Oriental bittersweet

Celastrus orbiculatus

Australian pine

Casuarina equisetifolia

Autumn olive, Elaeagnus, Oleaster, Japanese Silverberry

Elaeagnus umbellata

Bamboo

Family Graminae

Branched broomrape

Orobanche ramosa

Brazilian pepper

Schinus terebinthifolius

Broomsedge, Beard grass

Andropogon spp.

Burning bush, Fireweed, Summer cypress

Kochia scoparia (L.) Roth

Bush honeysuckle

certain Lonicera spp.

Callery pear

Pyrus calleryana

Camelthorn

Alhagi maurorum Medik.

Canada thistle, Californian thistle, Canadian thistle, creeping thistle, field thistle, corn thistle, perennial thistle, field thistle

Cirsium arvense (L.) Scop

Cape ivy or German ivy

Delairea odorata

Chinese bush clover

Lespedeza cuneata (Dumont) G. Don

Chinese Clematis, Oriental virginsbower

Clematis orientalis L.

Cogongrass

Imperata cylindrica (L.) Beauv.

Common buckthorn, European buckthorn

Rhamnus cathartica L.

Common teasel, wild teasel, Fuller's teasel, venuscup teasel

Dipsacus fullonum L.

Cutleaf teasel

Dipsacus laciniatus L.

Dalmatian toadflax, broadleaf toadflax

Linaria dalmatica (L.) P. Mill.

Diffuse knapweed, white knapweed, spreading knapweed, tumble knapweed

Centaurea diffusa Lam.

Empress tree, Princess tree, Royal paulownia

Paulownia tomentosa (Thunb.) Sieb. & Zucc. ex Steud.

Field bindweed, Creeping Jenny

Convolvulus arvensis L.

French broom

Genista monspessulana (L.) L. Johnson

Giant hogweed, cartwheel-flower

Heracleum mantegazzianum

Giant reed, Spanish reed

Arundo donax L.

Gorse

Ulex L. spp.

Guinea grass

Urochloa maxima (Jacq.) R. Webster

Hairy whitetop, Hoary cress, Globe-podded hoary cress, Ball cress, White-top lens, Peppergrass

Cardaria draba (L.) Desv.

Hydrilla, Waterthyme

Hydrilla verticillata (L. f.) Royle

Italian ryegrass

Lolium multiflorum Lam.

Itchgrass

Rottboellia cochinchinensis (Lour.) W.D.Clayton

Ivy gourd

Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt

Japanese knotweed, fleeceflower, Mexican bamboo, huzhang

Polygonum cuspidatum Siebold & Zucc. Sacchalineuse, Fallopia japonica, Reynotria jap.

Johnsongrass, Johnson grass, Aleppo grass, Aleppo milletgrass

Sorghum halepense (L.) Pers.

Jointed goatgrass

Aegilops cylindrica Host

Knapweeds

Centaurea spp.

Knotweeds

Polygonum spp.

Kudzu

Pueraria montana (Lour.) Merr. var. lobata (Willd.) Maesen & S. M. Almeida

Leafy spurge

Euphorbia esula L.

Old World climbing fern

Lygodium microphyllum

Maile pilau, stinkvine

Paederia foetida L.

Mile-a-minute weed, Chinese tearthumb

Polygonum perfoliatum L.

Multiflora rose, baby rose, Japanese rose, seven-sisters rose, rambler rose, multiflowered rose

Rosa multiflora Thunb.

Musk thistle, Nodding thistle

Carduus nutans L.

Mysore thorn, Shoofly

Caesalpinia decapetala

Peruvian watergrass

Luziola peruviana Juss. ex J.F. Gmel.

Common reed

Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. ex Steudel

Slipper flower, Redbird flower

Pedilanthus tithymaloides

Long-stalked Phyllanthus

Phyllanthus tenellus

Poison hemlock

Conium maculatum

Purple loosestrife, spiked loosestrife

Lythrum salicaria L.

Reed canarygrass

Phalaris arundinacea L.

Russian knapweed, Turestan thistle, Creeping knapweed, Mountain Bluet, Russian cornflower, hardheads

Acroptilon repens (L.) DC.

Russian olive, oleaster

Elaeagnus angustifolia (L.)

Prickly Russian thistle

Salsola tragus L.

Ryegrass

Lolium spp.

Saltcedar, salt cedar, tamarisk

Tamarix L. spp.

Shoebutton

Ardisia elliptica Thunb.

Spotted knapweed

Centaurea biebersteinii DC. (syn. Centaurea maculosa)

Perennial peppergrass, slender perennial peppercress, broadleaf pepperweed, tall whitetop, giant white weed, iron weed

Lepidium latifolium L.

Tallowtree, Chinese tallow tree

Triadica sebifera (L.) Small, Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb.

Tree-of-heaven, China-sumac, varnishtree

Ailanthus altissima (Mill.) Swingle

Tropical soda apple

Solanum viarum Dunal

Trumpet vine

Campsis radicans

Common water-hyacinth, floating water hyacinth, jacinthe d'eau, Wasserhyazinthe, jacinto-aquatico, lechuguilla

Eichhornia crassipes

Wild parsnip

Pastinaca sativa L.

Yellow star thistle, geeldissel, golden star thistle, St. Barnaby's thistle, yellow centaury, yellow cockspur

Centaurea solstitialis L.


NON-WEED INVASIVES (FAUNA)

SCIENTIFIC NAME

Africanized honeybee, African honey bee, Killer bees

Apis mellifera scutellata Lepeletier

Bagworm

Thyridopteryx ephemeraeformis (Haworth)

Boll weevil

Anthonomus grandis Boheman

Dutch elm disease causal agent

Ophiostoma ulmi

Eastern tent caterpillar

Malacosoma americanum (Fabricius)

Emerald ash borer

Agrilus planipennis (Fairmaire)

Grasshoppers

Melanoplus spp.

Gypsy moth, European gypsy moth

Lymantria dispar Linnaeus

Eucalyptus redgum lerp psyllid

Glycaspis brimblecombei Moore

Mimosa webworm

Homadaula anisocentra (Meyric)

Oak wilt causal agent

Ceratocystis fagacearum

Pine bark beetles

Family Scolytidae

Red imported fire ant

Solenopsis invicta Buren

Sudden oak death casual agent

Phytophthora ramorum

West Nile virus

Flavivirus

Zebra mussel

Dreissena polymorpha (Pallas, 1771)

Resources

Sample DOT Invasive Species Inventory Forms
View Sample Form [ pdf / 8kb]

An Overview of Common IRVM or IVM Steps

One of the best overviews of IVM plan components is a series of technical bulletins developed  as a resource for vegetation managers seeking practical information on effective, environmentally sound methods for managing invasive species.  The series was authored by the Bio-Integral Resource Center (BIRC) through a U.S. EPA grant.  These bulletins have been published on the Internet at IPM Access through a separate EPA grant as a result of the EPA's interest in this type of information being made freely available to a wider audience.  The following sections, addressing the principle components of IVM programs, are adapted from that resource:

  • Gathering background information and conducting weed inventories.
  • Setting management objectives.
  • Establishing monitoring programs to inventory weed growth stages, locations, and acreage infested.
  • Setting treatment action levels and treatment thresholds to determine if treatment is necessary.
  • Using weed prevention measures and revegetation in your management plan.
  • Applying effective, least-toxic management methods.
  • Educating the public.
  • Evaluating the program.

The goal of an IVM or IRVM program is to keep noxious weed populations low enough to prevent unacceptable spread, damage, or annoyance, and to encourage desirable vegetation to permanently replace the weeds. Treatment occurs only when monitoring indicates thresholds have been reached and treatment is necessary. Several methods are selected from educational, biological, cultural, manual, mechanical, and least-toxic chemical control tactics, and then integrated into a treatment program. IVM emphasizes revegetation with desirable plant species as well as other actions that will prevent future weed infestations.  When applied appropriately, the IVM process results in improved management, lower cost, greater ease of maintenance, and lower environmental impacts from control activities.

Gathering Background Information on the Target Invasives

Gathering as much information as possible about the biology and growth patterns of the target weed can assist and help direct management.  Still other useful information can only be gathered on site and will be specific to your own problem situation.  Information that will help staff to identify the target species may include:

  • Common and scientific name
  • Picture (as a young plant and in full seed/flower) - note if easily confused with others
  • Annual or perennial
  • Growth form and habits
  • How tall the weed grows
  • Timing of flowering or seed setting, which varies with latitude
  • Distribution, geographical origin, and site preferences

Life cycle and lifespan information also helps determine proper treatment methods. Perennial weeds store nutrients underground and can access these reserves to resprout repeatedly.  Maintenance staff may find the following valuable in determining appropriate treatment:

  • How does the weed reproduce?  If the weed spreads by seeds, note the flowering time since control measures will usually occur before the flowers produce seeds to prevent another seedcrop.   Are a large number of seeds produced?
  • What is the mechanism(s) of seed dispersal and how can it be reduced?

Also important are any special challenges the species presents in attempting to manage or control it.  Knowing such challenges helps the design, construction, or maintenance manager to plan accordingly.  For example, all invasives tend to have seeds that remain viable in the soil for many years

  • Can one small fragment regenerate an entire plant?
  • Is the target weed found in sensitive areas such as wetlands or streamsides where treatment methods are limited?
  • Is the weed resistant to certain types of control methods?
  • Who are the people and the agencies that are concerned about this weed?
  • What is the natural history of the site you are trying to manage (the soil type, amount of rainfall, species of animals and competitive vegetation present)?
  • How is the land being used (present and future plans) and what is the history of land use?
  • What is the history of weed control on the site?
  • Is this a recent invasion or an old problem?

Understand the Damage or Potential Threat

The damage caused to native plant communities by invasive species is extensive. Not only do weeds directly compete with native species for space, light, moisture, and nutrients, but they also have the ability to physically alter the structure or the nutrient cycling of a system, disrupting natural ecosystem function to which native communities are adapted. 

Set Management Objectives

When setting management objectives, the weed manager will need to balance the resources available with the requirements of the law.  The following questions may help in clarifying objectives:

  • What are the legal requirements?
  • What are the available resources (money, people, time)?
  • Which control strategies are best suited to the weed I am trying to manage and the area in which it occurs?
  • What is the availability of biological control agents or grazing animals?
  • What are the environmental considerations?
  • What other people or agencies do I need to collaborate with?
  • What kind of follow-up preventive measures will need to be implemented?
  • What kind of public education is needed?
  • What is the desired level of control (see below)? Can this level be sustained by my resources?

Levels of potential control include:

  • Containment - keeping an established population of the weed in check so that the area infested by the weed does not increase. This strategy can be employed against newly-invading weeds or well-established species. It is especially useful when time and money are in short supply or when the infestation is very large.
  • Reduction - reducing the area covered by a weed, or reducing the dominance of that weed. This strategy can also be used against new or established weeds, but it requires more resources and more time than containment.
  • Eradication - completely eliminating the weed from the management area. This strategy usually consumes the greatest amount of time and resources and is applicable mainly to newly-invading weeds that are confined to a limited number of small areas.

Setting Treatment Action Levels

Sufficient resources are seldom available. Weed management is a process that continues over many years, and weed managers are continually prioritizing treatment areas and balancing the priorities with their resources. This process is called "setting treatment action levels." When the weed population reaches an intolerable level, a DOT takes action to treat it.

Two situations that increase the priority of a site are 1) the discovery of a small "outlier" population, a recent invasion from another area that must be taken care of soon in order to prevent a bigger problem later, or 2) the discovery that the weed population has become a threat to agriculture, native plants, food sources for wildlife, highway safety, water resources, etc. Inevitably there are areas that are lower in priority and will be tolerated for the short-term. Complete eradication may not be practical unless the patches are very small. Moreover, to maintain populations of natural enemies, some individual plants must be permitted to persist.

Setting treatment thresholds includes prioritizing and balancing treatments with resources. Weeds will be treated when populations increase beyond a predetermined level. This level will largely depend on the characteristics of the site and weed. In some cases the level may be no weeds at all, and in other cases the number of weeds you can tolerate may be much greater.

Establishing a Monitoring Program

In IVM, monitoring is the repeated inspection of areas that may be subject to noxious weed problems. Written records will allow comparison of inspections over time to reveal how conditions are changing, especially whether noxious weed populations are increasing or decreasing.  

  • Focused limited monitoring resources on sites where problems are most likely to occur. Public sightings of new weed infestations may be encouraged through an education or incentive program (see Educating Vegetation Management Personnel and the Public).
  • Maintain records of your monitoring activities. Creating standardized forms will make data collection easier and help remind you to gather all the information you need. Forms work best if they include labeled blanks for all pertinent information and allow the user to check or circle rather than having to write words or numbers.  See examples of forms, which often include information such as the name(s) of the person(s) collecting the data, the location, and date of monitoring; a qualitative description of the vegetation, such as the names of the plants or types of plants (native vegetation, annual/perennial weeds, trees, etc.) and stage of growth (germinating, flowering, setting seed, etc.); a quantitative description, such as percent cover, density, size of the patch, or if possible, the number of plants.
  • Note special conditions such as unusual weather events, and record treatment history, including information on treatment applications (who, when, where, how, cost, difficulties, and successes). This will allow you to evaluate and fine-tune treatments.

Monitoring efforts should be scheduled to coincide with critical life stages of the weed or its biological controls. If possible, plan monitoring sessions alongside other scheduled activities in the area to save time and labor. After treatment activities and at the end of the season, schedule monitoring sessions to help you evaluate your program.

Evaluate the Vegetation Management Program

At the end of the season, evaluate and fine-tune your program in order to improve it the next year. Some questions to ask at the end of the season might be: [N]

  • Were the objectives of the management program met?
  • Were all the necessary components of the program actually developed?
  • Were they integrated successfully? Were the right people involved in the integration?
  • Which control methods seem to be working and which do not?  Keep in mind, this is best answered over a span of years.
  • Do some of these methods need fine-tuning?
  • What kind of follow-up is needed next year?
  • How can I best communicate this information?

Costs are central to a decision to continue an IVM program. It is important to keep in mind that the transition period to IVM will probably involve investing in the management of infested areas to achieve stable vegetation that will reduce management costs in future years. Native plants and other beneficial vegetation take years to establish. Although you may find that total annual costs drop during the first year of IVM, it is also possible that costs may increase somewhat; however, after two or three years costs should decline and stabilize below the historical average.

Invasive Species Control Contacts at State DOTs

Alabama

John E. Lorentson
State Maintenance Engineer
334-242-6272
lorentsonj@
dot.state.al.us

Ron D. Newsome
Assistant Maintenance Engineer
334-242-6274
newsomer@
dot.state.al.us

Howard Peavey
State Agronomist
334-242-6282
peaveyh@
dot.state.al.us

Alaska

Clint Adler, P.E.
Research Engineer
907-451-5321
clint_adler@
dot.state.ak.us

Bill Ballard
Statewide Environmental Coordinator
907-465-6954
bill_ballard@
dot.state.ak.us

Carol Sanner
Environmental Analyst
907-753-5593
carol_sanner@
dot.state.ak.us

Arizona

LeRoy Brady
Manager Roadside Development
602-712-7357
lbrady@azdot.gov

Bruce Eilerts
Program and Projects Manager I for Natural Resources Management Section
602-712-7398
belierts@azdot.gov

 

Arkansas

John Harris
Section Head, Special Studies
501-569-2281
john.harris@
arkansashighways.com

Phillip Moore
Botanist, Special Studies
501-569-2281
phillp.moore@
arkansashighways.com

Charles Flowers
Agronomist, Maintenance
501-569-2091
charles.flowers@
arkansahighways.com

California

Barbara Pollock
D10 Maintenance 
209-948-7462
Barbara_Pollock@
dot.ca.gov

Jack Broadbent  
HQ Landscape Arch
906-653-3120
Jack_Broadbent@
dot.ca.gov

Bob Melendez
D1 Maintenance
707-445-6391
Bob_Melendez@
dot.ca.gov

Colorado

Jack Stieber
Station Weed Coordinator
303-273-1845
Richard.Stieber@
dot.state.co.us

Cathy Curtis
Landscape Architect II
303-757-9174
cathy.curtis@
dot.state.co.us

Mike Banovich
Landscape Architect II
303-757-9542
michalel.banovich@
state.dot.co.us

Connecticut

Delois Barnes
Landscape Designer
860-594-3307 
Delois.Barnes@
po.state.ct.us

R. Bruce Villwock
Landscape Designer
860-594-2612
r.bruce.villwock@
po.state.ct.us

Kimberly Lesay
Environmental Planning
860-594-2933 
Kimberly.Lesay@
po.state.ct.us

Florida

Jeff Caster
State Transportation Landscape Architect
850-414-5267
jeff.caster@
dot.state.fl.us

Tim Allen
Roadside Manager, State Maintenance Office
850-410-5757
tim.allen@
dot.state.fl.us

 

Hawaii

Chris Dacus
Landscape Architect
808-592-7600
Christopher.A.Dacus@
hawaii.gov

   

Illinois

Craig Mitckes
Roadside Manager
217-782-2984
mitckescw@
dot.il.gov

Matt Sunderland
Landscape Architect
217-557-9035
sunderlandmj@
dot.il.gov

 

Indiana

Rick Phillabaum
Landscape Architect 
317- 233-5151
RPhillabaum@
indot.state.in.us

Steve Perry
Biological Services
317-232-5206
SSperry@
indot.state.in.us

David Lamb
Landscape Specialist
317-232-5509
DLamb@
indot.state.in.us

Iowa

Joy Williams
Agronomist
515-233-7729
joy.williams@
dot.iowa.gov

Bill Pusateri
Botanist     
515-239-1796
william.pusateri@
dot.iowa.gov

Mark Masteller
Chief Landscape Architect
515-239-1424
mark.masteller@
dot.iowa.gov

Kentucky

P. David Cornett
Roadside Env. State Adm.
502-564-4556 
davidp.cornett@ky.gov

Michael A. Smith
Roadside Env. Consultant
502-564-4556
michaela.smith@ky.gov

Darrell Burks
Roadside Env. Consultant
502-564-4556
darrell.burks@ky.gov

Louisiana

AJ Roeling
Roadside Development Manager
337-262-6117
aroeling@
dotd.louisiana.gov

Roy Dupuy
Landscape Architect, Chief
225-379-1969
roydupuy@
dotd.louisiana.gov

 

Maryland

Kenneth Oldham
Chief, Landscape Operations Division
410.545.8590
koldham@
sha.state.md.us

Donald Cober
Technical Resource Specialist
410.545.8596
dcober@
sha.state.md.us

William Klingelhofer
Assistant Resource Specialist              
410-545-8585
wklingelhofer@
sha.state.md.us

Minnesota

Paul Walvatne
Forestry Unit Supervisor
651-284-3793
paul.walvatne@
dot.state.mn.us

Tom Jacobson
District 1 IRVM Coordinator
218-348-6454
Thomas.jacobson@
dot.state.mn.us

Stanly Ross
Met District Spraying Coordinator
651-775-0373
stanly.ross@
dot.state.mn.us

Mississippi

Dave Thompson
Roadside Development Mgr.
601-359-9722
dgthompson@
mdot.state.ms.us

Chris Bryan
Roadside Development Mgr. Dist. 6
601-544-6511
cbryan@
mdot.state.ms.us

Johnnie Thorne
Roadside Development Mgr. Dist 5
601-683-3341
jthorne@
mdot.state.ms.us

Missouri

Stacy Armstrong
Roadside Management Supervisor
573-751-8647
stacy.armstrong@
modot.mo.gov

Danny Woods
Roadside Management Specialist
573-751-8433
danny.woods@
modot.mo.gov

 

Montana

Dan Williams
Noxious weeds
406-444-7604 
dawilliams@mt.gov

Phil Johnson
Botanist
406-444-7657 
phjohnson@mt.gov

 

Nebraska

Art Thompson
Highway Landscape Architect
402-479-4839
athompso@
dor.state.ne.us

   

Nevada

Kent Mayer
Assistant Chief Maintenance Engineer
775-888-7856
kmayer@
dot.state.nv.us

Lori Bellis
Biologist
775-888 7035
lbellis@
dot.state.nv.us

Kevin Lee
District Engineer
775-777-2700

New Hampshire

Guy Giunta
Landscape Specialist
603-271-6476
ggiunta@
dot.state.nh.us

Paul Rushlow
Landscape Specialist
603-271-1611
prushlow@dot.state.nh.us

Mark Lauren
Dept. of Enviroment
mlauren@
dot.state.nh.us

New Mexico

Chris Sanchez
Management Analyst
505-827-2923
chris.sanchez@
nmshtd.state.nm.us

Louise Cavatta
Management Analyst
505-827-9709
louise.Cavatta@
nmshtd.state.nm.us

Vanessa Dominguez
District Management Analyst
505-285-3254
Vanessa.Dominguez@
nmshtd.state.nm.us

New York

Kyle Williams
Environmental Analysis Bureau
518-457-5566
kwilliams@
dot.state.ny.us

Ed Frantz
Utica Regional Office
315-793-2722
efrantz@
dot.state.ny.us

John Falge
Watertown Regional Office
315-785-2343
 jfalge@
dot.state.ny.us

North Carolina

Derek Smith
VM Section Engineer
919-733-2920
dcsmith@
dot.state.nc.us

David Harris
State EC and VM Manager
919-733-2920
davidharris@
dot.state.nc.us

Don G. Lee
State Roadside Environmental Engineer
919-733-2920
dglee@
dot.state.nc.us

Ohio

Scott Lucas
Maintenance
614-644-6603
Scott.Lucas@
dot.state.oh.us

John Baird
Environmental
614-466-1913
jbaird@
dot.state.oh.us
 

 

Oregon

Will Lackey
Vegetation Management Coordinator
503-986-3010
william.lackey@
odot.state.or.us

   

Pennsylvania

Joseph S. Demko
Roadside Manager
717-783-9453
jodemko@
state.pa.us

John Whaley
RLA, Roadside Development
717-783-5036
jwhaley@
state.pa.us

Stuart Kehler
District Environmental Manager
814-696-7223
skehler@
state.pa.us

Rhode Island

Barbara Petrarca
Supervising Landscape Architect    
401-222-2023 ext. 4090
bptrarca@
dot.state.ri.us

Sheleen Clarke
Senior Landscape Architect  
401-222-6765 ext. 4849
sclarke@
dot.state.ri.us

Emilie Holland
Sr Environmental Scientist
401-222-2023 ext 4051
eholland@
dot.state.ri.us

South Carolina

KellyJo Swygert
Program Coordinator
803-737-1290
SwygertKJ@
scdot.org

Timothy Edwards
Landscape Architect
803-737-1949
EdwardsFT@
scdot.org

Berry Still
Environmental Engineer
803-737-9967
StillJB@
scdot.org

Texas

Dennis Markwardt
Vegetation Management Section Director
512-416-3093
dmarkwt@
dot.state.tx.us

Steve Prather
Vegetation Specialist
512-416-3197
sprather@
dot.state.tx.us

John Mason
Vegetation Specialist
512-416-3081
Jmason@
dot.state.tx.us

Utah

Ira Bickford
Roadside Vegetation Manager
801-965-4119
ibickford@utah.gov

Terry Johnson
Landscape Architect, Wetlands
801 965-4598
terryjohnson@utah.gov

 

Vermont

Craig Dusablon
Landscape Coordinator
802 527-5448
craig.dusablon@
state.vt.us

Jane Brown
Landscape Architect
802-828-2724
jane.brown@
state.vt.us

 

Virginia

Brian Waymack
Roadside Section Mgr.
804-371-6801         
Brian.Waymack@
VDOT.Virginia.gov

Scott P. Johnson
Landscape Program Planner
 804-786-5552
Scott.Johnson@
VDOT.Virginia.gov

 

Washington

Ray Willard
Roadside Maintenance LA
360 705-7865
willarr@
wsdot.wa.gov

Mark Maurer
Roadside Design LA
360 705-7242
maurerm@
wsdot.wa.gov

James Morin
Roadside Maint. E. Wash
360 705-8218
morinj@
wsdot.wa.gov

West Virginia

James L. Riggs
Vegetation Management Coordinator
304-558-2901
jriggs@
dot.state.wv.us

   

Wisconsin

Dick Stark
Landscape Architect
608-266-3943
richard.stark@
dot.state.wi.us

Gary Birch
Biologist
608-266-1017
gary.birch@
dot.state.wi.us

 

Wyoming

John Samson
Agronomist
307-777-4416
John.Samson@
dot.state.wy.us

Ken Shultz
State Maintenance Engineer
307-777-4458
Ken.Shultz@
dot.state.wy.us

 

U.S. Forest Service

Mike Ielmini
National Invasives Species Coordinator
202-205-1049
mielmini@fs.fed.us

Bob Lange
National Partnerships Coordinator
202-205-0931
boblange@fs.fed.us

John Bell
Road System Operations and Maintenance Engineer
703-605-4612
jbell01@fs.fed.us

< back to top >
 
Return to Section 1.1 »
 
Table of Contents
 
Chapter 11
Appendix
11.1 Florida DOT Environmental Policy 11-1
11.2 Kentucky Transportation Cabinet Environmental Policy 11-1
11.3 Maine Dot Environmental Policy 11-2
11.4 North Carolina DOT Environmental Stewardship Policy 11-3
11.5 PennDOT’s Green Plan Policy Statement 11-3
11.6 Washington State Dot Environmental Policy 11-4
11.7 New South Wales Roads and Traffic Authority Environmental Policy 11-4
11.8 Texas Environmental Commitment Checklist 11-5
11.9 Maine DOT Environmental and Safety Auditing Policy and Procedure 11-11
11.10 Maine DOT Corrective Action Request Form 11-14
11.11 Mass Highway Compliance Tracking Methods 11-15
11.12 Mass Highway Compliance Tracking Roles and Responsibilities 11-16
11.13 Mass Highway Self-Audit Procedure 11-17
11.14 Mass Highway Facility Self-Audit Checklist 11-18
11.15 Mass Highway Environmental Roles & Responsibilities 11-20
11.16 Mass Highway Environmental Section EMS Roles and Responsibilities 11-20
11.17 Mass Highway Operations Division EMS Roles and Responsibilities 11-22
11.18 Mass Highway District EMS Roles and Responsibilities 11-23
11.19 Mass Highway Training Expectations By Role 11-24
11.20 Mass Highway Environmental Training Program Roles and Responsibilities 11-25
11.21 PennDOT District 10 SEMP Responsibility Table 11-26
11.22 PennDOT District 10 SEMP Training Table 11-28
11.23 NYSDOT Construction/Environmental Training Schedule 11-29
11.24 Environmental Checklist for MoDOT Facilities 11-30
11.25 PennDOT Stockpile Quality Assurance Responsibilities 11-33
11.26 PennDOT 15-Minute Stockpile Walkaround 11-34
11.27 PennDOT Stockpile Snapshot 11-34
11.28 PennDOT Maintenance Stockpile Activity Protocol 11-35
11.29 PennDOT Post-Storm Salt Management Tracking Responsibilities 11-41
11.30 Risk, Compliance Issues, and Management Examples for Highway-Generated Waste - Oregon DOT 11-42
11.31 NYSDOT-DEC Deer Carcass Composting – Practice Guidelines 11-43
11.32 NYSDOT’s Draft Metric for Assessing Performance of Integrated Vegetation Management on ROW 11-47
11.33 NCDOT Roadside Vegetation Management Guidelines in Marked Areas 11-50
11.34 Invasive Species Coordination and Control DOT Resources
   
Lists: Examples | Tables | Figures
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