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TRB Research Record Addresses Travel Behavior and Values

The Transportation Research Board has released a series of papers concerning travel behavior and values in Volume 2664 of its Transportation Research Record journal. The issue addresses measuring stability of mode choice behavior, activity duration analysis, and car ownership amongst the millennial generation. The record also addresses monetary valuations of travel time and quality of travel, week-long work episode scheduling models, evaluation of time use and goods consumption, and short-distance trips. For more information, link to the report. (10-2-17)

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Peer Exchange Report Explores Transportation, Land Use Themes

The Federal Highway Administration has released a report on the Transportation Planning Capacity Building “Happy, Healthy, Smart Cities Symposium” peer exchange. The exchange, held earlier this year by the Knoxville Regional Transportation Planning Organization and the East Tennessee Community Design Center, included a series of documentaries concerning transportation and health outcomes, the link between land use and transportation, and the future of smart cities technology. Exchange participants emphasized the need for communicating complex policy, making public involvement more interesting, and the need for accelerating project development. The peer exchange indicated the importance of increasing the number of transportation options for people to choose from and the importance of small changes in street design. For more information, link to the report. (September 2017)

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NCHRP Reports Highlight Travel Forecasting Tool Design and Use

The National Cooperative Highway Research Program has issued two reports regarding the development of the software tool TFGuide, for travel forecasting. TFGuide aids in the selection of methods and techniques based on application needs, resource constraints, available data, and existing model structure. NCHRP Report 852 provides an overview of how to use the tool and a case study to demonstrate how a metropolitan planning organization used the software to perform a transit corridor study. The report also addresses the role of the travel forecaster, transportation planner, and decision maker. The NCHRP also issued a companion document that addresses the current state of practice in travel demand models, the software design and functionality of TFGuide, pilot tests conducted using the tool, and a history of travel forecasting legislation. For more information, link to the web-only document and the research report. (10-20-17)

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Report Describes Accommodation of Pedestrians with Visual Disabilities

Effective practices and considerations for accommodating pedestrians with vision disabilities on shared streets are described in a report issued by the Federal Highway Administration. The guide discusses strategies people with vision disabilities use to navigate in the public right of way, and challenges with shared streets used by pedestrians, bicyclists, and motor vehicles. It provides an overview of U.S. guidance, a toolbox of strategies for designing shared streets, and ideas on how accessibility for pedestrians with vision disabilities can be addressed in the planning and design process. For more information, link to the report. (10-27-17)

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U.S. Gets Low Grades on the Availability of Walkable Communities

The National Physical Activity Plan Alliance has issued a report card that evaluates the state of walking and walkable communities in the United States. The report assigns grades based on percentages of people who engage in a category of walking activity and the percentage of states that meet a specified standard. The report gives the U.S. a grade of F for overall pedestrian infrastructure because less than 30 percent of states met the standard of $5.26 per capita for biking and walking project funding. The U.S. also received an F for public transportation because less than 30 percent of states have a transit commute share greater than the 6 percent benchmark, with only seven states meeting the standard. For more information, link to the report card. (10-16-17)

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New Guide Addresses Bus Rapid Transit Development

The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy has issued a guide for planning bus rapid transit (BRT) systems. BRT systems provide high capacity and speed at low costs and combines segregated bus lanes and other quality-of-service elements. The guide addresses the initiation of a project and the preparations and calculations, such as demand analysis and service planning, needed for creating a BRT project. The guide also addresses stakeholder engagement, how to educate customers on using the system, and the necessary infrastructure required. In addition, financial modeling, fare policies, and businesses structures are highlighted for ensuring a financially stable project. For more information, link to the announcement. (10-13-17)

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NCHRP Report on Laws, Policies for Automated Transit Operations Published

A report presenting an overview of the challenges and opportunities for governments to enable automated transit systems has been published under the National Cooperative Highway Research Program. The report, Impacts of Laws and Regulations on CV and AV Technology Introduction in Transit Operations (NCHRP Web-Only Document 239), analyzes the state of technology and various deployment scenarios for fully automated transit. The report also discusses the impacts of the technology on public safety, workforce development, and operating agency planning. In addition, the report discusses possible necessary changes to laws and regulations that govern public transportation to ensure continued financial and regulatory support and remove barriers to industry. The report was prepared under NCHRP Project 20-102. For more information, link to the report. (10-9-17)

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Best Practices to Improve Bicycle, Walking Access to Transit in FTA Report

The Federal Transit Administration has issued a manual on best practices for improving the safety and access to transit for pedestrians and bicyclists. The manual provides an overview of the benefits of improving walking and biking connections to transit. The manual also provides best concepts for stops and stations such as including seating and shelter, improving access to transit lines, and making trash/recycling receptacles available for riders. In addition, the manual provides ideas for reducing pedestrian and bus conflicts. Case studies are included to highlight the City of Atlanta’s prioritization of corridors that link multimodal transit hubs and efforts in Los Angeles illustrating how the city’s regulatory environment and level of funding enable transportation projects. For more information, link to the report. (9-23-17)

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UC Davis Launches Collection of Bicycle Research

The University of California at Davis, National Center for Sustainable Transportation, has launched a website containing its bicycle research collection, including research on bicycling behavior, dynamics, infrastructure, and policy. The research collection includes planning tools on estimating total miles walked and biked, operating bicycle facilities, and increasing bicycling for daily travel. The collection also provides links to the City of Davis bike map and to biking education classes, shops, and clubs. The website debut coincides with the 2017 International Cycling Safety Conference which begins Sept. 20-23, to discuss emerging issues on bicycling safety. For more information, link to the announcement and collection. (9-20-17)

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Report Evaluates National Household Travel Survey Program

The Federal Highway Administration has released an evaluation on the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) Program. The report discusses the breadth and depth of NHTS use; the program’s impacts on policy, project, and decision making; and the program’s responsiveness to its user community. Results indicate that NHTS users are regularly developing documents, reports, and statistics based on the survey data. The report also found that state and municipal organizations use the NHTS to develop travel demand models that inform decision making and that the NHTS Program effectively engages with its user community. The report recommends that program staff do more tracking of NHTS data usage to capture federal, state, and local government uses, and work more with congressional policy staff. For more information, link to the report. (August 2017)

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TRB Video Series Outlines Methods for Measuring Walkability

The Transportation Research Board has posted a series of videos concerning methods of measuring walkability used by bicycle and pedestrian planners. The videos include: Defining and Applying Walkability to Decision Making: Predicting Equity, Health & Economic Benefits of Land Use & Transportation Investments; Using Embodied Videos of Walking Interviews in Walkability Assessment; and The Pedestrian Index of the Environment (PIE). For more information, link to the videos and related slides. (9-5-17)

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Case Study Addresses Active Transportation Planning in Dallas-Fort Worth Area

The Federal Highway Administration has issued a report concerning coordinated planning for active transportation facilities in the Dallas-Fort Worth (D/FW) Area, as part of FHWA’s Livable Communities Case Study Series. To address the walking and bicycling needs of citizens, the D/FW area created a bike plan in 2011 and has since launched a bike share program and a bond package to allocate $20 million for shared use path projects. The region has completed several complete streets projects as a result of public engagement efforts and converted the Continental Avenue Bridge into a park to link downtown and West Dallas. In addition, the North Central Texas Council of Governments hosted a planning workshop with three D/FW counties to partner on projects to connect cities to each other and the D/FW airport. Funding strategies, public engagement, and community collaboration have led to alternative transportation growth for the region. For more information, link to the case study. (6-28-17)

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Traffic Monitoring Addressed in Transportation Research Record

Fourteen research papers concerning methods for monitoring automobile, truck, bicycle, and pedestrian traffic are provided in the Volume No. 2644 of the Transportation Research Board’s Transportation Research Record journal. The papers address bicycle and pedestrian counts at signalized intersections, evaluation of annual average daily traffic calculation methods, and the use of municipal vehicles as sensor platforms to monitor roadway traffic. The papers also address quality measure of short-duration bicycle counts, strategies for monitoring multiuse trail networks, and the costs of independent bicycle and pedestrian projects. For more information, link to the publication. (8-12-17)

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New Guidance Shows Benefits of Big Data to Understand Travel Patterns

The State Smart Transportation Initiative (SSTI) has issued a new resource to help decision makers understand travel patterns. The report provides guidance on various types of data sources, such as Bluetooth, location, and GPS from mobile devices, that are used to collect information concerning where and when people travel and by what modes. The report also highlights examples of how this data was applied in the Connecting Sacramento study, which revealed that trip-making data helps to understand first-and-last mile connections. Recommendations include having decision makers enlist data providers to help interpret data, asking specific questions to make data interpretation easier, and aggregating trip-making data over larger areas to create a robust sample size. For more information, link to the report. (8-7-17)

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National Park Service Funding Supports Park Infrastructure

The National Park Service (NPS) has announced the availability of more than $50 million to support maintenance and infrastructure projects at 42 parks in 29 states. The funding will be used to improve trails, roads and bridges, restore buildings, and increase visitor access to parks. The $20 million in federal funding will be added to funding from many non-federal partners. Projects will include addressing deferred maintenance on the Alluvial Fan Trail in Rocky Mountain National Park, and the development of a multi-use trail to connect the visitor center at the Gettysburg National Military Park to a historic farm. Funding also will be used for maintaining and improving trails, retaining walls and overlooks at the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone in Yellowstone National Park. For more information, link to the announcement. (7-24-17)

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FTA Proposes Public-Private Partnerships in Public Transportation

The Federal Transit Administration will facilitate public-private partnerships in public transportation via a new proposal regarding Private Investment Project Procedures (PIPP). The procedures will advance private-sector participation and investment in project planning, development, finance, design, construction, maintenance, and operations. The PIPP system will allow funding recipients to request modification or waiver of FTA requirements if such requirements discourage the use of public-private partnerships. The FTA says that the PIPP system will not be used to waive requirements under the National Environmental Policy Act. Comments on the proposed rule are due Sept. 29, 2017. For additional information, link to the announcement. (7-31-17)

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Des Moines Area MPO Develops Data Bike to Score Trail Conditions

The Des Moines Area Municipal Planning Organization, in partnership with the Iowa Department of Public Health and the Iowa Natural Heritage Foundation, has developed the Iowa Data Bike. The electric-assist bicycle generates data that scores the condition of trails through an app that senses roughness of pavement. Data will be collected for all paved trails to create a long-term maintenance strategy for the trail network in central Iowa. The bike also will be used to collect Google Street View images for regional trails and geocoded imagery of trail conditions. For more information, link to the announcement. (7-21-17)

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Report Highlights Accessibility Metrics and Trip Data in Sacramento

The State Smart Transportation Initiative released a report concerning best practices for the use of accessibility metrics and trip-making data from mobile devices. The study, Connecting Sacramento, focuses on the light rail transit system in Sacramento, Calif., and the Stockton Boulevard bus corridor to highlight locations with poor connections to existing transit, describe people’s travel behavior in those locations, and assess applicable improvements. The report provides an equity analysis to identify areas that serve low-income households with favorable transit accessibility and ideal areas for future affordable housing. For more information, link to the report. (7-24-17)

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TRB Research Record Addresses Connected and Automated Vehicles

The Transportation Research Board has published a compilation of papers concerning connected and automated vehicles in Volume 2625 of its Transportation Research Record journal. The journal includes an analysis of the effective connected-automated vehicle technologies on travel demand and addresses driving mode decision making for intelligent vehicles in stressful traffic events. The journal also addresses the public’s opinion of connected vehicle systems and includes a risk analysis of autonomous vehicles in different traffic environments and a method for gauging usage opportunities for partially automated vehicles. For more information, link to the journal. (7-20-17)

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Study Evaluates Urban Development as a Determinant of Health Inequalities

The Mountain-Plains Consortium has issued a report concerning how urban development patterns may create health inequalities. The report examines data from road segments in the Denver metropolitan area to understand whether minority race/ethnicity and lower socio-economic status associate with higher traffic exposure when accounting for the populations’ likelihood of living closer to roads and the relationship between traffic, demographic and socioeconomic variables. The report indicates that minorities and those with lower socio-economic status and without a college education are associated with a higher exposure to traffic. The report also reveals that poverty is a consistent predictor of traffic density in the Denver metropolitan region. For more information, link to the report. (June 2017)

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FTA Issues $226.5 Million to Improve Transit Bus Services

The Federal Transit Administration has announced the availability of $226.5 million in funding under the Grants for Buses and Bus Facilities Infrastructure Investment Program. The program helps states, local governments and Indian tribes improve the condition of their bus infrastructure by funding the replacement and rehabilitation of buses and associated facilities. A minimum of $22.6 million will be provided for rural bus needs. Applications are due Aug. 25, 2017. For more information, link to the announcement. (7-12-17)

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Minnesota DOT Analyzes Traffic Impacts Related to Bicycle Facilities

The Minnesota Department of Transportation has issued a report to evaluate traffic impacts to inform design guidelines for on-street bicycle facilities. On-street facilities include design treatments such as striped shoulders, drain grates, pavement markings, and signage. The report includes a review of driver behavior and several evaluations of facilities by federal, state, and local agencies. The report also highlights case studies conducted in nine locations that indicated that drivers are more likely to remain in their travel lanes, and are less likely to encroach into adjacent lanes, pass, or queue behind cyclists, when on roads with buffered or striped bicycle lanes. Study results indicate that bicycle lanes should be adopted instead of shared lane markings or signage. For more information, link to the report. (June 2017)

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Homeland Security Department Evaluates Autonomous and Semiautonomous Vehicle Security Concerns

The Department of Homeland Security, Office of Cyber and Infrastructure Analysis, has released an assessment concerning autonomous and semiautonomous vehicle deployment. The assessment evaluates safety concerns and the need for liability provisions as vehicle autonomy progresses. Several cyber risks that may arise as technologies become more integrated within vehicles are highlighted, in addition to long-term benefits such as congestion relief and heightened safety. Vehicle deployment could also result in an increase in urban sprawl or population movement to suburbs due to technology development that allows drivers to work, sleep or accomplish other tasks during their commute. For more information, link to the report. (June 2017)

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Study Evaluates Public Opinion on Transportation Funding

Data regarding the public’s opinion on federal funding of public transit, highways, and local streets and roads have been compiled in a study by the Mineta Transportation Institute at San Jose State University. The report compares results from eight surveys that were administered from 2010-2017, that address public perception of an increase in the federal gas tax rate, a new national mileage tax, and a new national sales tax. Respondents were fragmented based on travel behavior and sociodemograhic characteristics. Overall, a majority of Americans support higher taxes for transportation, except for the flat-rate mileage fee. A majority of respondents also believe that the quality of public transit is either very good or somewhat good and place a high or medium priority on expanding public transit in their state. For more information, link to the report. (7-2-17)

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FHWA Highlights North Central Texas’ Consideration of Health in Long-Range Planning

The Federal Highway Administration has issued an overview of how health considerations have been incorporated into the planning efforts of the North Central Texas Council of Governments. The NCTCOG used resources developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to identify health indicators, data on various transportation-related public health measures, and strategies for improving citizen health. The area’s latest long range plan includes new strategies to reinforce and promote improved health in the 12-county region. For more information, link to the overview. (6-28-17)

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Study Finds Milwaukee Residents Have Unequal Access to Biking, Walking Facilities

The Rails-to-Trails Conservancy has issued a report finding that neighborhoods in Milwaukee that experience social or economic inequality have a disproportionate lack of access to multimodal facilities. Specifically, in certain parts of the city only 3 percent of residents are within walking distance of a trail and 8 percent are within biking distance of a trail. These areas are predominantly African-American or Hispanic neighborhoods and have higher concentrations of poverty, unemployment and zero-car households. The study used RTC’s “BikeAble” tool, a GIS-modeling platform that analyzes connectivity to determine the best low-stress routes for bicycling. Low-stress routes are ones with speed limits below 25 miles per hour and which lack significant physical barriers to safe crossing for bicyclists or pedestrians. For more information, link to the report. (6-27-17)

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New Version of Transit Oriented Development Standard Issued

The Institute for Transportation and Development Policy has issued an updated transit-oriented development standard. The new voluntary standard increases the emphasis on inclusionary housing, providing safe streets, parks, playgrounds, schools, and health facilities for all neighborhoods, for all ages, abilities, demographics, or incomes. The TOD Standard is a guide and tool to help assess, plan, and shape urban developments, based on eight core principles of urban design and land use, each supported by specific performance objectives and measurable indicators. Planners and policymakers can use the standard to create a scorecard to measure how development meets the principles. For more information, link to the TOD Standard 3.0. (6-25-17)

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APA Specifies Metrics for Measuring a Healthy Built Environment

Tools for measuring health within the built environment are addressed in a report issued by the American Planning Association. The report provides a set of “Healthy Planning Metrics” that can be used to assess, mea­sure, monitor, and report progress toward healthy planning goals. The report identifies five areas where planners could intervene to improve health: active living, healthy food system, environmental exposure, emergency preparedness, and social cohesion. The metrics can be integrated into regular plan­ning processes and used to create monitoring plans to meet community goals. For more information, link to the report. (May 2017)

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Alabama Case Study on Improved Transportation Alternatives Issued

Prioritizing livability and connectivity through transportation improvements in Foley, Ala., is addressed in a new case study issued by the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The city worked with stakeholders to connect walking and biking facilities that were separated by State Route 59 to create its 2011 Bicycle & Pedestrian Plan. The city of Foley received a Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant to implement several projects within the plan, including the addition of a pedestrian bridge and shared use paths to facilitate active transportation and increase economic activity. A new one mile shared use path to connect networks for walking and bicycling will also be funded. For more information, link to the case study. (5-19-17)

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Park-and-Ride Management Addressed in TRB Research Reports

The Transit Cooperative Research Program has released decision-making toolboxes to plan and manage park-and-ride facilities for public transportation. TCRP Research Report 192 serves as a guidebook to address site-specific project planning, park-and-ride typologies, and charging for parking. The guidebook also highlights the adoption of transit-oriented development to maximize use of land and how to incorporate park-and-ride facility maintenance into asset management practices and plans. TCRP Web-Only Document 69 includes a literature review of park-and-rides and demand estimation models for effective planning. Case studies highlighting the Bay Area Transit Authority’s parking demand management strategies and Connecticut Department of Transportation’s park-and-ride demand modeling are also provided. For more information, link to the research report and web-only document. (6-16-17)

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FHWA Report Describes Use of Variable Speed Limit Signs

Current practice in use of variable speed limit (VSL) signs is addressed in a new report released by the Federal Highway Administration. VSL systems are used to calm traffic and increase safety using information on traffic speed, occupancy, volume detection, weather, and road surface conditions. The report includes data from interviews with agencies with active VSL systems throughout the U.S. It highlights benefits from VSL systems and challenges that include enforcement, driver compliance, lag in data and a lack of cost-benefit data to justify use of a VSL system. The report indicates that systems are primarily used for congestion, weather and work zones and that some agencies such as the Missouri Department of Transportation have deactivated their systems due to driver noncompliance. For more information, link to the report. (5-31-17)

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Best Practices for Rural Regional Transit Outlined in NCHRP Report

An evaluation of state and regional best practices with regard to public transportation in rural areas has been issued by the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP Project 20-65 (56)). The report identifies several types of rural transportation services that do not involve private vehicles. These include intercity bus service for long-distance travel, local public transit for regularly-scheduled service in a defined area, and on-demand single-passenger transportation. However, the report recognizes a need for agencies to support an additional distinct type—called rural regional mobility—which would be open to the general public and would address the kinds of trips than can be made in a day, rather than overnight, while also considering possibilities for meeting intercity needs. The report includes an overview of state policies, multiple case studies, a collection of lessons learned, and a checklist for developing a rural regional mobility program. For more information, link to the report. (5-15-17)

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Transportation Alternatives Annual Report Issued

The annual report documenting the Transportation Alternatives (TA) projects and funding for fiscal year 2016 has been posted by the Federal Highway Administration. The report shows that the vast majority of TA projects, more than 77 percent, were related to pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Other eligible categories that received funding included recreational facilities, turnouts and viewing areas, historic preservation, environmental and wildlife, safe routes to school, and other. The FHWA received 4,179 applications and selected 2,088 projects for funding. The total cost for the selected projects was $595.5 million. For more information, link to the report. (5-11-17)

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Transportation Planning Excellence Awards for 2017 Announced by FHWA

The Federal Highway Administration has announced the winners of its 2017 Transportation Planning Excellence Awards. The recipients include a “best-of-the-best” award presented to the San Diego Association of Governments for its San Diego Forward Regional Plan. FHWA also announced 11 additional award winners and three honorable mentions from regions in California, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, Oklahoma, and Tennessee. Award-winning planning initiatives included efforts focused on sustainable communities, transit systems, multimodal planning, community outreach, indirect and cumulative effects, bicycle and pedestrian planning and streetscapes. For more information, link to the 2017 award winners web page. (5-10-17)

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CDC Task Force Reviews Strategies to Increase Physical Activity

The Community Preventive Services Task Force of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a report reviewing studies of land use and transportation strategies that will increase physical activity. The task force recommends that built environment approaches should combine features such as street connectivity and bicycle infrastructure with access to parks or mixed land uses to increase physical activity. Replacing findings from 2004, the report is based on a review of 90 studies that address diverse designs, different combinations of options, and long-term changes for transportation and recreational physical activity. The report highlights studies of construction projects, evaluations of the impact of sprawl, comparisons of neighborhood types and differences in the amount of time engaged in physical activity. For more information, link to the report. (5-5-17)

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Several Cities Designated as Walk Friendly Communities

The Walk Friendly Communities Program, in sponsorship with FedEx, has designated cities such as New York, Eugene, Ore., Fayetteville, Ark., and Fort Lauderdale for improved sidewalk connectivity and the promotion of walking to work or school. The Walk Friendly Designation includes seven new cities and renewed designation for three recipients for their efforts in expanding opportunities for walking and improving pedestrian safety. The program is supported by the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center and awards designations from bronze to platinum. Applications to join the walk friendly communities are due June 15, 2017. For more information, link to the announcement. (5-5-17)

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New Toolkits Provide Smart Growth Approach in Rural Areas

Three new toolkits concerning well-placed housing, location of community facilities and fiscal impacts in rural communities have been released by Smart Growth America. The toolkits address how the government can provide residents of affordable housing better access to work, hospitals and shopping by changing zoning restrictions and protecting Section 515 housing. Also, community facility location policies can be developed to increase access to services. In addition, the fiscal impact analysis toolkit is intended to help localities with the cost and benefit decisions related to new development. Each toolkit provides case studies, model policies and best practices. For more information, link to the toolkits. (4-26-17)

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2016 Benchmarking Report on Biking and Walking is Issued

The Institute of Transportation Engineers has announced the Bicycling and Walking in the United States: 2016 Benchmarking Report. The report, in partnership with the American Public Health Association and League of American Bicyclists, is presented as a website to provide users with tools to analyze collected data on bicycling and walking in all 50 states, the 50 largest U.S. cities, and a few mid-sized cities. The report is intended to allow exploration of the intersections between transportation, health and equity, and support the shift toward active transportation modes. The report also can be purchased in hard copy. For more information, link to the announcement and the report. (4-25-17)

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Bike Share Ridership Data Available from NACTO

The National Association of City Transportation Officials has released bike share ridership data showing that over 88 million trips have been taken on a bike share bike nationwide from 2010 to 2016 and that the system has grown to over 42,000 bikes. The largest bike share systems are located in Boston, Chicago, Miami, New York and Washington, D.C., with systems recently added in Los Angeles and Portland, Ore. The data show that the average trip time is 12 minutes for members and 25 minutes for casual users. Also, 24 percent of systems have income-based subsidized passes. For more information, link to the report. (3-9-17)

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Featured Case Study

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    Utah DOT's 'Road Respect Community' Program Provides Support, Recognition for Community Bicycle Programs

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